For Google, it’s location, location, location

I know… all Google is trying to do is help you get “better”, or at least more relevant, results from a search. And Google has assumed that you are your location — that where you are searching from really matters. Much of the time, that’s great. But for us professional searchers who search outside our own country, Google has just made a change that will significantly affect our search strategies.

Until now, if you wanted to focus your search on results from the UK and you were located in the US, you would go to the UK version of Google at google.co.uk. And yes, you’d always get different results than when you ran the identical search in google.com. However, according to a recent Google blog post, this trick will no longer work.

Now the choice of country service will no longer be indicated by domain. Instead, by default, you’ll be served the country service that corresponds to your location. So if you live in Australia, you’ll automatically receive the country service for Australia, but when you travel to New Zealand, your results will switch automatically to the country service for New Zealand. Upon return to Australia, you will seamlessly revert back to the Australian country service.

There’s a workaround; go to Settings and select Advanced Search. Scroll down to “Then narrow your results by…”, pull down the Region menu, and select the country you want to use to focus your search.

step-1       step-2

I tried this out with a search for Brexit, first searching in google.co.uk, then in google.co.uk with the Region set as United Kingdom. And, just curious to see if it would make a difference, I tried a third search in google.co.uk after setting my VPN to connect in the UK. And I got different search results from all three searches. Below are the top search results, highlighting the results that only showed up at the top of one of the three searches. Note that each search turned up results that weren’t in the top of the other two.

compare.jpg

Bottom line: I’ll now be doing three searches when I’m using Google to find information from a specific country or region. Thanks, Google…

 

Super searching tips

I just got back from Internet Librarian 2017 (in beautiful Monterey, CA — tough assignment). Among the insights I’ve brought back are:

Google Image search is focused more on matching meaning than matching images. If you want to search for instances of an image (to watch for usage of your organization’s images or to find mentions of a chart or graph in a report or article, say), you’re better off using a reverse-image search tool like TinEye instead.

A use of reverse image search I don’t often remember is to see if you’re looking a legitimate profile in social media or a fake. Right-click the person’s image, copy the URL and search for other instances of that image. If it’s a fake profile, it’s likely that whoever set up the profile used an image that appears elsewhere on the web, often a stock photo.

Remember Google’s undocumented (i.e., not in Google Help) prefix searches.  You can use intext: to look for words in the body of the page, intitle: for words in the title, inurl: for words that appear in the URL itself; and inanchor: for the words that appear in the anchor text (the text that’s highlighted in a hyperlink). Remember that you can’t have a space between the prefix and your search term — use intitle:asteroid to find web pages that have the word asteroid in the title, for example.

And I just learned about a new top-level domain – .graphics, so you can look for web pages specifically pertaining to computer and data graphics by searching for site:*.graphics.

When researching a topic, consider whether you want to search by process (how do I do this activity/thing?) or outcome (how can I get this result?). You’ll use different words and find different results based on which perspective you take.

You can also see my slide decks from IL2017 — Super Searcher Strategies and (ROI) Truth to Power.

“You’re charging WHAT?!?”

Shocked and surprised childYou’ve probably had this happen to you at least once… You have what seems like a perfectly normal conversation with a prospective client, you send what you think is a perfectly reasonable proposal, and your client responds with shock at how expensive you are.

It’s easy to react badly in this kind of situation; you know how much value you bring to any project and you know you’re worth what you are charging. (If you’re not sure that you’re worth that, go read the Harvard Business Review article, “Why You Should Charge Clients More Than You Think You’re Worth,” and Mary Ellen’s Amazing Hourly Rate Calculator.)

At the beginning of my career as an solopreneur, I took this kind of response badly; I assumed that either I had vastly overrated myself and my value or I had utterly failed because no one saw what I had to offer.

Fortunately, I’ve adjusted my attitude and now have a more positive approach. When I’m told that I am too expensive, I run the Internal Entrepreneurial Translator™ in my brain and hear them saying that they simply don’t currently have the budget or need for my expertise and level of service. I also remind myself that, while they aren’t hiring me now, situations change. People change jobs, and talk with their peers. Organizations suddenly find available funds. Priorities shift. All of these are reasons to treat any rejected proposal as simply not a good match at this time, for this client, in this situation. The bottom line may just be that their organization has different priorities for their resources at this time. That’s OK; the interaction can be respectful and positive. They’re just not at a place where they need your level of service.

And I use these experiences as opportunities to look at how I’m presenting myself and my skills. I ask myself if I’m focused entirely on outcome or if I’m talking about activity. Am I focused on what my client values the most and how I can help them achieve that goal, or am I talking about what I’ll do and what my hourly rate is.

I make sure I’m not talking about how I “need” to be paid $X because I have a mortgage/rent and other expenses to pay. Because, frankly, clients don’t care about what our expenses are. All they are about is receiving high-quality services that address their needs. I focus on making sure that my price reflects the outcome my clients will see.

The Public Speaker’s Secret Weapon

Eyes Behind Red Curtains On Wood StageAlthough I’m pretty comfortable speaking in front of a crowd now, I wasn’t born that way. In fact, I remember being absolutely terrified for at least the first few dozen presentations I gave. I managed to get the terror under control but it took many years before I discovered the secret weapon that has completely turned around my experience speaking in public.

You’re probably familiar with the problem of confirmation bias – the human tendency to look for, recognize and remember information that confirms our preexisting beliefs and theories. As info pros, we have to be on guard against confirmation bias; it can blind us to relevant information that could challenge the entire premise of our research.

But for public speakers, keeping this human default setting in mind can be very reassuring. Remember, people chose to come to your presentation, join your webinar or attend the meeting you are leading. That means they all have a vested interest in confirming to themselves that they made a good decision to spend their time listening to you. They’re not secretly counting up your grammatical mistakes, judging your choice in footwear, or wondering why your hair looks like that. Rather, they are looking for evidence that they made a good choice.

Once I realized this, I developed a quick little ritual that I now practice before every presentation I give or meeting I lead. I find a quiet space (and yes, it might just be a bathroom stall), close my eyes and take a couple of deep breaths. I imagine the room filling up with people, each of whom is – subconsciously at least – rooting for me. I conjure up a feeling of gratitude that every person in the audience is on my side; they are confident that I’ll do a fine job and they know they will be glad they chose to spend time with me. I smile, even if I have to force myself, and take one more deep breath, inhaling gratitude and exhaling a calm confidence that I will show up at my very best.

Yes, it sounds woo-woo, but this technique has changed my experience of public speaking. The people who have joined me for this event are my allies, not something to be feared. They’re more than willing to forgive me when I suddenly lose my train of thought, as long as I get myself back on track and keep going. They won’t focus on whether or not I have a particular degree or so many years of experience; they just want to come away knowing more than they did before.

I still feel that adrenaline rush as I’m being introduced and I walk to the podium, but it’s not immobilizing. I recognize it as a tool to help me think on my feet, and I look at it as confirmation that I’ll give a great presentation.

Try this approach and see how it works for you. Public speaking may never feel completely natural, but you can hone your skills in managing and channeling your initial anxiety.

Killing the Task Monsters

I’m a great list-maker. I have to-do lists everywhere; they have been compiled carefully, organized strategically, color coded and tagged. But when it comes to actually getting all those listed things done, it’s another matter. Some I can get done right away, and virtuously check that item as DONE. Others I look at, think “ugh, that’s going to take time”, and skip over, day after day. Pretty soon, they become big ugly Task Monsters, glaring at me reproachfully, daring me to take them on.

I finally realized I could slay the Task Monsters the same way you eat an elephant… a bite at a time. I have gone from to-do lists to to-do index cards, and that has transformed how I approach projects both large and small. Whether it’s managing a complex client project, re-imagining a web site, developing a new marketing plan or scoping out a home renovation job, everything has its own pile of cards.

The magic is that I sort the cards based on how long I think the task will take. There are 15-minute cards for items like “Reach out to Anne to schedule informational interview” and “Email graphic designer re: logo”. There are half-hour cards for “Scope out options for new fridge” and “Sketch out upcoming webinar on big data”. For the tasks that I know will take more attention, I have 2- to 4-hour cards for jobs like “Write proposal for speaking opportunity at 2018 SLA conference” and “Outline new web page flow”.

Sure, it takes some time to chunk out all my projects into index-card-sized jobs, but I consider this time well spent. Now, when I have 20 minutes to spare before my next appointment, or a meeting was unexpectedly postponed and I have two unscheduled hours, I go through my cards to see what I feel like tackling.

The magic of these cards is that they’re so easy to pick up when you find yourself at the end of one task and not sure what to do next. While it might feel daunting to open up a folder labeled “New Marketing Plan”, it doesn’t take much to flip through some cards and choose one small item to take care of. Before you know it, you’ve made a significant dent in that daunting project. Take that, Task Monster!

ADDED: Joann Wleklinski suggested color-coding the cards – using a different color for each time category. Brilliant!